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Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke



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Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke

The Bristol Blenheim Mk IV had originally been developed as the Bristol Bolingbroke. While that name was abandoned for British production, it was revived in 1937 to distinguish aircraft produced under license in Canada by Fairchild Aircraft.

The Bolingbroke was only used by the R.C.A.F. It was first issued to No. 8 (Bomber Reconnaissance) Squadron late in 1939, and used for coastal reconnaissance.

The Bolingbroke’s war did not really start until 1942. In that year two squadrons were sent to Alaska and the Aleutian Islands (No. 115 arriving in April, No. 8 in June). There the Bolingbroke engaged in anti-submarine patrols, gaining a share in the sinking of the Japanese submarine Ro32 on 7 July 1942 (shared with the U.S. Navy).

The majority of Bolingbrokes were used in the Commonwealth Air Training Plan, which allowed R.A.F. pilots to train in safety in Canada.

Mk I

The first 18 Bolingbrokes were identical to the Blenheim Mk IV, including British instrumentation.

Mk II

The eighteen Mk Is were also used to test out new designs. One aircraft was rebuilt after a crash to use American instruments, and redesignated the Mk II. Experience from this model would be used on the Mk IV.

Mk III

Two more Mk Is were converted into float planes during 1940, using two Edo floats. The use of float planes was investigated by most sides in the Pacific war where the long distances involved and lack of suitable airfields made sea planes seem desirable. In most cases, the addition of the floats reduced the performance of the aircraft to unacceptably low levels. The Bolingbroke Mk III did not enter production, and the two prototypes were converted back to Mk Is during 1942.

Mk IV

The Bolingbroke Mk IV was the standard version of the aircraft. It used the 905 hp Mercury IV engine (late production used the Mercury XX, with 950 hp) and American instrumentation. 151 Mk IVs and 457 Mk IV-Ts were produced in total.

Mk IV-W

Fourteen of the 151 Mk IVs were build using the Pratt and Whitney Wasp Junior engine (825 hp). The type was developed to guard against any shortage of Mercury engines, but not shortage developed.

Mk IV-C

Another engine tried out in the Bolingbroke was the 900hp Wright-Cyclone GR-1820-G3B. Tests revealed that this engine did not produce a significant improvement in performance, so the type did not enter production.

Mk IV-T

The most numerous version of the Bolingbroke was the Mk IV-T, used as a trainer. In total 457 Mk IV-Ts were built, with the first deliveries in March 1942. The final 57 were powered by the Mercury XX-star engine. Another 51 airframes were completed, but not delivered.

Introduction - Combat Record - Mk I - Mk IV - Mk V - Bisley - Bolingbroke - Stats - Picture Gallery


Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke - History

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WARBIRD REGISTRY > BLENHEIM/BOLINGBROKE REGISTRY >
The Bristol Blenheim was a British light bomber aircraft designed and built by the Bristol Aeroplane Company that was used extensively in the early days of the Second World War.

It was adapted as an interim long-range and night fighter, pending the availability of the Beaufighter. It was one of the first British aircraft to have all-metal stressed-skin construction, to utilise retractable landing gear, flaps, powered gun turret and variable pitch propellers.
The Blenheim Mk I outshone most biplane fighters in the late 1930s but stood little chance against the German Messerschmitt Bf 109 during daylight operations, though it proved successful as a night fighter. The Mark IV variant was equally unsuccessful in its daylight bombing role, suffering major losses in the early stages of the war.

The Fairchild Bolingbroke was a Canadian-built variant used as a maritime patrol aircraft by the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War. Built by Fairchild-Canada, it was a variant of the Blenheim Mk IV bomber.

Below is a list of Blenheim and Bolingbroke airframes that survived military service.


Fairchild Bolingbroke (Bristol Blenheim) at Nanton museum recalls RCAF role in WW2 Alaska

20th August 2016 | Nanton, Alberta, Canada. One of the often overlooked airplanes of the Second World War is the Bristol Blenheim, which was produced in Canada as the Bolingbroke. The Bolingbroke served the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) as a maritime patrol aircraft and via the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP) as an advanced combat trainer and target tug. Bomber Command Museum of Canada’s 30th Anniversary ceremonies, which were held today, appropriately utilized the facility’s Bolingbroke, which wears Blenheim livery, as a backdrop for speakers.

Bristol Type 142M Bolingbroke. RCAF archives photo .

Early in the conflict the Royal Air Force (RAF) heavily employed Bristol Blenheims. In fact, as BCMC’s website states, “Just one minute after Britain’s formal declaration of war against Germany took effect on September 3, 1939, a Blenheim IV of 139 Squadron took off to fly the RAF’s first sortie of the war, a photo-reconnaissance operation. The next day, Blenheims made the first Bomber Command attack by bombing enemy warships.” England was at war with National Socialist (Nazi) Germany at Blenheims were in the thick of the aerial fighting.

Blenheim Mark IV of 21 Squadron at Bodney in August 1941. Public Domain via Wikipedia.

However, the aeroplanes, which had been considered quite advanced when debuted in 1935 and compared to the RAF’s standard fighters (the Gloster Gladiator and Hawker Fury), were by late 1939 generally unable to cope with opposing German Luftwaffe Messerschmitt Bf 109s and Bf 110s during their often unescorted missions over the Nazi-occupied continent. Antiaircraft fire also proved a formidable impediment for Blenheims. Thus, loss tallies were unacceptably high and Blenheims were withdrawn from service (The Bomber Command War Diaries. An Operational Reference Book: 1939-1945, page 301) by RAF Bomber Command after No. 18 Squadron, RAF’s, nocturnal intruder mission against the airfields of Leeuwarden, Rheine, Twente and Vechta on the night of 17th/18th August 1942.

BCMC Memorial. Photo: John T. Stemple.

The federal government of Canada, prior to entering the war, was interested in producing contemporary military designs and modernizing the RCAF inventory. The Commonwealth country understandably looked to the United Kingdom as a source.

One combat type that could be readily built was the Blenheim. In 1937 a contract was let that permitted license production of the Blenheim Mk IV through Fairchild Aircraft Ltd. The Bolingbroke (aka “Boly”) was the first modern, all aluminum aircraft built in Canada. Notably, the Fairchild versions incorporated instrumentation and other equipment manufactured in Canada and the United States. Some 600 were assembled at Longueuil, Quebec.

/>RCAF ensign flying over BCMC. Photo: John T. Stemple.

The first of the Bolingbrokes entered service with the RCAF in November 1939. No. 8 (Bomber Reconnaissance) Squadron was the first unit to receive to the Bolingbroke.

Canada, having been designated as a major partner in BCATP, placed the majority of Bolingbrokes in the training programme. In addition to performing as advanced multiengine aircrew trainers, others were converted for work as target tugs to train antiaircraft gunners.

Two RCAF squadrons were assigned to the American-Canadian defence perimeter to protect the Aleutian Islands and west coast of Alaska from Japanese attack. Combat usage of Bolingbrokes was limited to RCAF units based in Canada, Alaska and the Aleutian Islands. Ron Mackay summarizes (Bristol Blenheim In Action, page 41) Bolingbroke combat operations. He indicates that the planes were used primarily to fly anti-submarine coastal patrols over both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

No. 8 (Bomber Reconnaissance) Squadron, which operated Bolingbroke Mk Is and Mk IVs from December 1940 to August 1943, was posted to RCAF Station Sea Island, which was located on the west coast of Canada, as part of RCAF Western Air Command. In June 1942, in response to the Imperial Japanese Navy’s 7th December 1941 attacks on military bases around Pearl Harbour, Territory of Hawaii, it was equipped with twelve Bristol Bolingbroke IVs moved to Alaska as a component of RCAF X Wing. The unit operated from Elmendorf Field at Anchorage, and additionally small detachments were based at U.S. Naval Air Station Kodiak and Marks Army Air Field at Nome. During March 1943 No. 8 returned to RCAF Station Sea Island.

No. 115 Squadron, RCAF, which was equipped with Bolingbroke Mk Is from August 1941 to December 1941 and Mk IVs from November 1941 to August 1943, arrived in the Aleutians in April 1942 and was assigned anti-submarine patrol and maritime reconnaissance missions. No. 115 was an RCAF Canadian Home War Establishment Squadron and patrolled the coastal waters of British Columbia and Alaska as a component of Western Air Command. On 7th July 1942 Flight Sergeant P.M.G. Thomas and his Bolingbroke crew sighted and attacked the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) submarine Ro32. The attack damaged the submersible and Thomas and his Wireless Operator promptly directed U.S. Navy destroyers to the coordinates. The submarine was believed to have been sunk by the American warships, but Japanese records (Bowyer, page 116) show the boat in service during August 1945.

Starboard rear view of Bolingbroke. Photo: John Stemple.

BCMC’s example is Bolingbroke #9987, a trainer model (Mk IV-T). The aeroplane was powered by two Bristol Mercury XX nine-cylinder, air-cooled, supercharged 920-horsepower radial engines. It served with No. 3 Bombing and Gunnery School at MacDonald, Manitoba, as part of the BCATP. The plane was restored as a Bomber Command Blenheim IV. On 12th August 2000 it was dedicated in the memory of Pilot Officer Barry Davidson, a pilot from nearby Calgary who was shot down while flying a No. 18 Squadron Blenheim IV on 6th July 1940 on attacks on Luftwaffe aerodromes in France.

It is Bomber Command Museum of Canada’s 30th anniversary, and more than seven decades after the end of the Second World War the Bolingbroke stands as a tribute to the airmen who completed the first offensive mission of the conflict and the many young Canadian males who gave their lives in the defence of freedom and in service to King, Mother Country and Bomber Command. May they always be remembered.

The author (John T. Stemple) thanks Bomber Command Museum of Canada and General Manager Andrea Townshend (and staff members Andrea Ramsay, Cara Gray and Mercedes Brentnall) of the High River Ramada Hotel and Kathryn of the Auditorium Hotel in Nanton for their exceptional hospitality and customer service.

Sources and Suggested Readings

Boyer, Chaz. Bristol Blenheim. Shepperton: Ian Allen Ltd. 1984.

Mackay, Ron. Bristol Blenheim In Action. Carrollton: Squadron Signal Publications, Inc. 1988.

Middlebrook, Martin and Chris Everitt. The Bomber Command War Diaries. An Operational Reference Book: 1939-1945, London: Penguin, 1990.


Fairchild ( Bristol) Bolingbroke

Built by Fairchild Aircraft Limited in Longueuil, Quebec, the Bristol Bolingbroke was operated in multiple roles by the Royal Canadian Air Force during WW II. It was a variant of the Bristol Blenheim Mk IV.

This was an important aircraft for Quebec’s aviation manufacturing industry as it was one of the first all-metal, stressed skin aircraft manufactured in Canada, and required the development of new skills by the local workforce.

During WWII the RCAF used the Bolingbroke in anti-submarine patrols off the Canadian and Alaskan coasts, general reconnaissance and crew training, especially gunners and bomb aimers.

Fairchild Aircraft Limited build over 600 of these twin-engine bombers during WWII.

This aircraft was rescued from a farmer’s field in Western Canada. Restoration work is underway, and it will be finished in the Coastal Command livery representing Bolingbroke number 9066, a “Boly” that served in several squadrons on both coasts and in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.

When restoration is completed, it will be placed on static display.

The Bolingbroke cockpit is a real attraction As well as being on display at MAM, we also often take it to external airshows and exhibitions where it always attracts lots of attention, especially from children. Here’s the latest status on the Bolingbroke aircraft restoration project by the Montreal Aviation Museum (MAM) volunteers.


Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke - History

Bristol Blenheim and Fairchild Bolingbroke

Data current to 18 April 2021.

(Umeyou Photo)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. IV, RCAF (Serial No. 9118), coded BK-V, No. 115 (Bomber Reconnaissance) Squadron, Patricia Bay, British Columbia, 1942.

The Fairchild Bolingbroke was a maritime patrol aircraft and trainer flown by the RCAF during the Second World War . Built by Fairchild-Canada, it was a license-built version of the Bristol Blenheim Mk. IV bomber. The Bolingbroke had a distinctive shape compared to the Blenheim. The nose was lengthened to provide more room for the bombardier, with the upper left surface of the nose being scooped out to maintain pilot visibility during takeoff and landing.

The Bolingbroke had a longer range than the Blenheim and also fulfilled a Canadian requirement for a maritime patrol aircraft. Fairchild Aircraft Ltd. (Canada), based in Quebec, started production of the Blenheim Mk. IV as the Bolingbroke (the originally intended name for the Blenheim IV). This aircraft was nicknamed the "Bolly". After a small run of aircraft constructed to British specifications, as the Bolingbroke Mk. I, Fairchild switched production to the Bolingbroke Mk. IV with Canadian and American instruments and equipment. These versions also included anti-icing boots and a dinghy. One of the early Mk.. IV variants was the Bolingbroke Mk IVW which was powered by two 825 hp (615 kW) Pratt & Whitney SB4G Twin Wasp Junior engines. The Bolingbroke was incapable of maintaining altitude on one engine, therefore the normal bomb load was reduced to 500 pounds on these aircraft to compensate for the low engine power. The most-produced variant was the Bolingbroke Mk. IVT trainer . A total of 626 Bolingbrokes were produced. Most of the Mk. IVs built served in their intended role as patrol bombers on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of Canada between 1940 and 1944. Two squadrons of these aircraft also served in Alaska during the Aleutians campaign . The Mk. IVT trainers saw extensive use in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP).

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. I , powered by two Bristol Mercury VIII radial piston engines, with British equipment (18), (Serial Nos. 702-719) , Mk. II , conversion of fifth Mk. I with US equipment. It served as the prototype of the Mk IV, (1), (Serial No. 705), Mk. III , fl oatplane conversion of sixteenth Bolingbroke Mk. I, with two Edo floats, (1), (Serial No. 717), Mk. IV , equipped with anti-icing boots and a dinghy, also fitted with American and Canadian instruments and equipment, powered by two Bristol Mercury XV radial piston engines, (185), (Serial Nos. 9001-9004, 9006-9009, 9024-9073, 9075-9201), Mk. IVW , Sub-version of Mk IV powered by two 825 hp (615 kW) Pratt & Whitney SB4G Twin Wasp Junior radial piston engines as contingency against possible shortages of Mercury engines. The Mk. IVW's performance was below that of the Mk. IV and the supply of the British engines was maintained so production returned to the Mk. IV after only 15 aircraft were built, (15), (Serial Nos. 9005, 9010-9023), Mk. IVC , Version of Mk IV with 900 hp (671 kW) Wright R-1820 Cyclone engines not requiring high octane fuel, (1), (Serial No. 9074), Bolingbroke Mk. IVT , m ulti-purpose trainer aircraft. A total of 350 built powered by Mercury XV engines, followed by a further 107 powered by the low-octane fuel Mercury XX* engine, giving a total of 457 built, with a further 51 cancelled. Six Mk. IVT were converted to dual controls. A further 89 were converted to Mk. IVTT Target Tug with the addition of winching gear in the rear cabin and target drogue storage in the bomb bay. Another source records (407), (Serial Nos. 9850-10256), for a total of 626 aircraft.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3602838)

Bristol 142M Blenheim Mk. IV, RAF (Serial No. DJ702).

(RCAF Archives, DND Photo)

Fairchild Bolinbroke (Serial No. 9122), No. 115 Squadron, RCAF, Annette Island, Alaska, Feb 1943. The aircraft is in a dispersal area by the Administration Building. The mountains are to the East.

(DND Photo)

Fairchild Bolingbroke, No. 8 Squadron, RCAF, Alaska, 1942. Left to Right: Flight Sergeant G.A. Anderson (Wing Air Gunner), J.M. McArthur (Pilot), W.J. Smith (Pilot), Flight Sergeant F.W. Johnston (Wing Air Gunner).

(DND Photo)

Fairchild Bolingbroke, No. 8 Squadron, RCAF, Alaska, 1942.

(IWM Photo C2449)

Bristol Blenheim Mk. IV bomber crew of No. 404 Squadron, RCAF. They are preparing to take off from Dyce, Aberdeen, in the UK in the evening of 17 May 1942, to take part in the attack on the German heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen off the coast of Norway. Six Blenheims were detailed to accompany the strike force of Bristol Beauforts in order to make dummy torpedo attacks on the cruiser so as to confuse the enemy anti-aircraft defences, and to provide fighter cover.

(RCAF Photo)

Bristol Type 142M Blenheim Mk. I in RCAF service.

(No. 437 Squadron Archives Photo)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. Is, No. 119 (Bomber Reconnaissance) Squadron, RCAF, Bolinbrokes, coded DM, in formation near Yarmouth Nova Scotia, 25 Aug 1941. Photo taken by a No. 118 (F) Squadron pilot flying escort.

(RCAF Photo)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. IV, RCAF Bolingbroke Mk. IVT (Serial No. 9896). (RCAF Photo)

( Library and Archives Canada Photo, e005176210)

Two aircrew examining a target drogue in front of a row of Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. IVTTs, including RCAF (Serial No. 9871), at No. 10 Bombing and Gunnery School, RCAF, Mount Pleasant, Prince Edward Island, 1944.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3325145)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. I (1), (Serial No. K7072), taken on strength with the RCAF on 15 Nov 1939. S/L Wray signing the book after trial with the first Bristol Bolingbroke in the RCAF, at RCAF Station Ottawa, 1939.

(RCAF Photo)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. III floatplane, RCAF (Serial No. 717). This fl oatplane was the sole conversion of the 16th Bolingbroke Mk. I, with the addition of two Edo floats. It flew with No. 5 (BR) Squadron from 30 Sep 1940 to Feb 1941 for operational evaluation.

(RCAF Photo)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. III floatplane, RCAF (Serial No. 717),

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3199782)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. III floatplane, RCAF (Serial No. 717), 8 Oct 1940.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3726439)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. III floatplane, RCAF (Serial No. 717), Dartmouth, NS, 1941.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3199783)

Fairchild Bolingbroke cockpit , 29 Apr 1942.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3643707)

Fairchild Bolingbroke cockpit .

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4302115)

Fairchild Bolingbroke with an RCAF Sgt pilot at the controls, 28 March 1943.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3521026)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. I, RCAF (Serial No. 702), 22 Nov 1939. This aircraft was flown by No. 147 (Bomber Reconnaissance) Squadron from July 1942 to March 1944)

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3199833)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. I, RCAF (Serial No. 702).

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3650410)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. IV, RCAF (Serial No. 9065), 1942.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3582238)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. IVC, RCAF (Serial No. 9074), 5 Aug 1942.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3582239)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. IVC, RCAF (Serial No. 9074), 5 Aug 1942.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3523316)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. IV, RCAF (Serial No. 9099), Rockcliffe, Ontario, 16 Sep 1942.

(DND Photo via Chris Charland)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 9903) from No. 8 Bombing & Gunnery School, Lethbridge, Alberta, landed halfway down the runway on 2 Feb 1943. It overshot the end of the runway and nosed up in deep snow.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3650413)

Fairchild Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 9182), 1944.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3583131)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke with Mk. III turret, 28 Jan 1944.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4292626)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke, RCAF rear Gunner with his .303-inch machine-gun.

(Mike Kaehler Photo)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 9892). CA&SM.

(Mike Kaehler Photo)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 9892). CA&SM.

(RCAF Photo)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 9892). CA&SM.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3650412)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 10203), 1944.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3650411)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 10203), 1944.

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke survivors:

(Mike Kaehler Photo)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 9944), Commonwealth Air Training Plan Museum, Brandon, Manitoba, on display next to the Comfort Inn, Trans-Canada Highway.

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IV, RCAF (Serial No. 9059), Commonwealth Air Training Plan Museum, Brandon, Manitoba.

Bristol 149 Bolingbroke Mk. IV (Serial No. 9883), Commonwealth Air Training Plan Museum, Brandon, Manitoba.

(Bzuk Photo)

Bristol 149 Bolingbroke Mk. IV (Serial No. 10107), Commonwealth Air Training Plan Museum, Brandon, Manitoba.

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 9869), Royal Aviation Museum of Western Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IV (Serial No. 9887). MacDonald, Manitoba.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 9892), coded YO-X, Canada Aviation and Space Museum, Ottawa, Ontario. This Bolingbroke was manufactured by Fairchild Aircraft Limited for the RCAF in June 1942, and was briefly listed with No. 1 Training Command in Toronto before going to No. 2 Training Command in Winnipeg in July. In June 1944, it was put in storage and in September 1945 it was sold as war surplus to George A. Maude. Maude moved the Bolingbroke to his property on Salt Spring Island, British Columbia. In 1962, he agreed to donate the aircraft to the RCAF. A Calgary company disassembled and trucked it to Alberta for restoration in May 1963. It was finished in the markings of an aircraft of No. 8 Squadron RCAF, which had used Bolingbroke IVs operationally on both coasts from 1941 to 1943. The aircraft was transported to Rockcliffe airport and officially handed over to the RCAF by Maude in an Air Force Day ceremony on 6 June 1964. The aircraft was later transferred to the Museum.

(National Bomber Command Museum Photo)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IV, RCAF (Serial No. 9987), Bomber Command Museum of Canada, Nanton, Alberta.

Bristol (Fairchild) 149 Bolingbroke Mk. 4 (Serial No. 9041), restored, Bomber Command Museum of Canada, Nanton, Alberta.

Bristol (Fairchild) 149 Bolingbroke Mk. 4 (Serial No. 9978), hulk, stored, Bomber Command Museum of Canada, Nanton, Alberta.

Bristol (Fairchild) 149 Bolingbroke Mk. 4 (Serial No. 9897), Bomber Command Museum of Canada, Nanton, Alberta.

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 9997), being restored at the Greenwood Military Aviation Museum, CFB Greenwood, Nova Scotia.

(Author Photo)

(Bzuk Photo)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, composite of two aircraft, RCAF (Serial No. 9093) and RCAF (Serial No. 10163), painted to represent RCAF (Serial No. 9104), C/N 11-880-107, coded BK-L, an aircraft flown by No. 3 Operational Training Unit (OTU) based at Patricia Bay during the Second World War, British Columbia Aviation Museum, Victoria, British Columbia.

(Author artwork)

(JustSomePics Photo)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 10117), to be painted as RCAF (Serial No. 714), No. 119 Squadron, Reg. No. C-GBLY. This aircraft is being rebuilt from the remains of eight aircraft salvaged from Manitoba in the mid 1980s. When the restoration is complete, the aircraft will be painted in the colours and markings of RCAF No. 119 "City of Hamilton" Squadron. Some of the parts for this aircraft came from (Serial No. 9949), (Serial No. 10040), and (Serial No. 10117). 626 Bristol Bolingbrokes were manufactured in Canada between 1939 and 1943. This aircraft is being restored to ground running condition at the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, Mount Hope, Ontario.

(Bull-Dozer Photo)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IV, RCAF (Serial No. unknown), being restored at the Canadian Aviation Heritage Centre, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Macdonald Campus, McGill University, 21,111 Lakeshore Road, Quebec.

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVTT, RCAF ( Serial No. 10121), painted to represent RCAF (Serial No. 9120). Québec Aerospace Museum (QAM), Musée de l’aérospatiale du Québec , 4625 rue Leckie, St. Hubert , Québec.

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IV, RCAF (Serial No. 9887), recovered from a farm in 2013 and being restored at 17 Wing, CFB Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 9904), being restored at the Reynolds-Alberta Museum, Wetaskiwin, Alberta.

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT (Serial No. 9990), unrestored, at the Reynolds-Alberta Museum, Wetaskiwin, Alberta.

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT (Serial No. 10120), unrestored, at the Reynolds-Alberta Museum, Wetaskiwin, Alberta.

(Alan Wilson Photo)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT (Serial No. 9895), c/n 11-880-207, and parts from (Serial No. 10038). This Bolingbroke is a composite restoration mostly using parts from (Serial No. 9895) and (Serial No. 10038), which was briefly airworthy in the UK in 1987 as Reg. No. G-MKIV. 9895 has been part of the museum since it was rescued from Canada in 1971, but restoration was only completed in 1996 once the additional components of 10038 became available. The aircraft is painted to represent Blenheim (Serial No. L9416), coded XD-A of RAF No. 139 Squadron, which crash landed near Hoepertingen, Belgium while on a mission to Maastricht on 12 May 1940. The squadron lost seven aircraft on this mission. She is now displayed at the Musee Royal de l'Armee et d'Histoire Militaire ( Royal Museum of the Armed Forces and of Military History) in Brussels, Belgium.

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IV, RCAF (Serial No. 9048), being restored at Aerospace Bristol, Filton, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom.

(Alan Wilson Photo)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IV, RCAF (Serial No. 9940), with the outer wings of (Serial No. 9059), finished in a genuine RCAF training colour scheme. National Museum of Flight, East Fortune, East Lothian, restored at Aerospace Bristol, Filton, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom.

(Hugh Llewelyn Photo)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 10001), restored as a Blenheim, painted as (Serial No. L8756), coded XD-E, of 139 Squadron RAF, on display in RAF Museum London, Hendon, United Kingdom.

(Hugh Llewelyn Photo)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 10001), restored as a Blenheim, painted as (Serial No. L8756), coded XD-E, of 139 Squadron RAF, on display in RAF Museum London, Hendon, United Kingdom.

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 10038), damaged in a crash on 21 June 1987, this aircraft is in storage at Duxford, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom.

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 10201), Reg. No. G-BPIV, airworthy with the Aircraft Restoration Company, at Duxford, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom.

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 9983), c/n 11-880-203, Reg. No. N4260C, in storage at Fantasy of Flight, Polk City, Florida.

(Gillfoto Photos)

Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke Mk. IVT, RCAF (Serial No. 10076), previously painted as (Serial No. Z9592), currently painted as (Serial No. 9118). This Canadian-built aircraft had an RAF North Africa paint scheme. It has been repainted in the colours of BK-V, an aircraft that flew with RCAF No. 115 Squadron, based at Patricia Bay, British Columbia during the war. It is on display at the Pima Air & Space Museum, Tucson, Arizona.


Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke - History



























Bolingbroke Mk.IV W
UK &mdash RAF WW-II maritime patrol bomber aircraft

Archive Photos

[Bristol "Bolingbroke Mk.IV W" RAF WW-II Maritime Patrol Bomber Aircraft (Restoration Project) c.2003 at the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, Mount Hope, Ontario, Canada (Photos by John Shupek)]

Overview 2

  • Bristol Bolingbroke
  • Role: Maritime patrol aircraft/trainer
  • Manufacturer: Bristol Aeroplane Company Fairchild Aircraft Ltd. (Canada)
  • First flight: 14 September 1939
  • Introduction: 15 November 1939
  • Primary user: Royal Canadian Air Force
  • Produced: 1939–1943
  • Number built: 626
  • Developed from: Bristol Blenheim

The Bristol Fairchild Bolingbroke was a maritime patrol aircraft and trainer used by the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War. Built by Fairchild-Canada, it was a license-built version of the Bristol Blenheim Mk.IV bomber.

Design and Development 2

In 1935, the British Air Ministry issued Specification G.24/35 to procure a coastal reconnaissance/light bomber to replace the Avro Anson. Bristol proposed the Type 149, based on its Blenheim Mk.I, with Bristol Aquila engines to give greater range. While the Air Ministry rejected this proposal, a Blenheim Mk.I, retaining its Mercury VIII engines, was converted as a Type 149 (Blenheim Mk.III) for the general reconnaissance role. The nose was lengthened to provide more room for the bombardier, with the upper left surface of the nose being scooped out to maintain pilot visibility during takeoff and landing.

The longer range also fulfilled a Canadian requirement for a maritime patrol aircraft. Consequently, Fairchild Aircraft Ltd. (Canada) of Quebec started production of the Blenheim Mk.IV as the Bolingbroke (the originally intended name for the Blenheim IV). This type was nicknamed the "Bolly". After a small run of aircraft constructed to British specifications, as the Bolingbroke Mk.I, Fairchild switched production to the Bolingbroke Mk.IV with Canadian and American instruments and equipment. These versions also included anti-icing boots and a dinghy. One of the early Mk.IV variants was the Bolingbroke Mk.IVW which was powered by two 825 hp (615 kW) Pratt & Whitney SB4G Twin Wasp Junior engines. Incapable of maintaining altitude on one engine, the normal bomb load was reduced to 500 pounds on these aircraft to compensate for the low engine power. The most-produced variant was the Bolingbroke Mk.IVT trainer, of which 457 were completed. A total of 626 Bolingbrokes were produced.

Operational History 2

Most of the 151 Mk.IVs built served in their intended role as patrol bombers on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of Canada between 1940 and 1944. Two squadrons of these aircraft also served in Alaska during the Aleutians campaign. The Mk.IVT trainers saw extensive use in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP).

Variants 2

  • Bolingbroke Mk.I: Twin-engine maritime patrol bomber aircraft, powered by two Bristol Mercury VIII radial piston engines, with British equipment. 18 built.
  • Bolingbroke Mk.II: Conversion of fifth Mk.I with US equipment - prototype of Mk.IV.
  • Bolingbroke Mk.III: Floatplane conversion of sixteenth Bolingbroke Mk.I, with two Edo floats.
  • Bolingbroke Mk.IV: Twin-engine maritime patrol bomber aircraft, equipped with anti-icing boots and a dinghy, also fitted with American and Canadian instruments and equipment, powered by two Bristol Mercury XV radial piston engines, 134 built.
  • Bolingbroke Mk.IVW: Sub-version of Mk.IV powered by two 825 hp (615 kW) Pratt & Whitney SB4G Twin Wasp Junior radial piston engines as contingency against possible shortages of Mercury engines. The Mk.IVW's performance was below that of the Mk.IV and the supply of the British engines was maintained so production returned to the Mk.IV after only 15 aircraft were built.
  • Bolingbroke Mk.IVC: Version of Mk.IV with 900 hp (671 kW) Wright R-1820 Cyclone engines not requiring high octane fuel. One built.
  • Bolingbroke Mk.IVT: Multi-purpose trainer aircraft. A total of 350 built powered by Mercury XV engines, followed by a further 107 powered by the low-octane fuel Mercury XX* engine, giving a total of 457 built, with a further 51 cancelled. Six Mk.IVT were converted to dual controls. A further 89 were converted to Mk.IVTT Target Tug with the addition of winching gear in the rear cabin and target drogue storage in the bomb bay.

Operators 2

Specifications (Bolingbroke Mk.IV) 2

General Characteristics

  • Crew: three
  • Length: 42 ft 9 in (13.03 m)
  • Wingspan: 56 ft 4 in (17.17 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 10 in (3.00 m)
  • Wing area: 469 ft 2 (43.6 m 2 )
  • Empty weight: 9,835 lb (4,470 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 13,750 lb (6,250 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 14,500 lb (6,591 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Bristol Mercury XV nine-cylinder air-cooled radial engine, 920 hp (685 kW) at 9,250 ft (2,820 m) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 250 knots (288 mph, 464 km/h) at 15,000 ft (4,570 m)
  • Cruise speed: 174 knots (200 mph, 322 km/h)
  • Range: 1,617 nm (1,860 mi, 2,995 km) at 170 mph (274 km/h)
  • Service ceiling: 27,000 ft (8,230 m)
  • Rate of climb: 1,480 ft/min (7.5 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 29.3 lb/ft 2 (143 kg/m 2 )
  • Power/mass: 0.14 hp/lb (0.24 kW/kg)
  • Guns: 1× fixed forward firing .303 in Browning machine gun and one .303 in Browning machine gun in power operated dorsal turret, alternately in the IVT, two Browning machine guns in a Bristol Type B1 Mk.IV turret
  • Bombs: 2× 500 lb (230 kg) or 4 × 250 lb (114 kg) bombs
  1. Shupek, John. Photos, Copyright © 2009 Skytamer Images. All Rights Reserved
  2. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Bristol Bolingbroke

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Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke - History

Constructed as a Bolingbroke by Fairchild Aircraft Ltd. (Canada) at Quebec, Canada.

Taken on Strength/Charge with the Royal Canadian Air Force with s/n 9023.

To Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, Mount Hope, Hamilton, ON.
View the Location Dossier

Restoration started.
The composite restoration was started using the nose from 10024 and various components from: 9889, 9937, 9949, 9981, 10040, 10117 and 10184.

To unknown owner with c/r C-GCWO.


Photographer: Mike Henniger
Notes: Photographed in the old hangar at the Canadian Warplane Heritage at Mount Hope, Ontario.


Photographer: Mike Henniger
Notes: Photographed in the new museum at the Canadian Warplane Heritage at Mount Hope, Ontario.


Photographer: Mike Henniger
Notes: Photographed in the new museum at the Canadian Warplane Heritage at Mount Hope, Ontario.


Photographer: Mike Henniger
Notes: Photographed at the Canadian Warplane Heritage in Mount Hope, Ontario.


Photographer: Mike Henniger
Notes: Photographed at the Hamilton Air Show hosted by the Canadian Warplane Heritage in Mount Hope, Ontario.


Photographer: Mike Henniger


Photographer: Reinhard Zinabold
Notes: 2012 photo taken at Hamilton Air Show, Canada


Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke - History

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 21 December 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

To stored reserve with No. 1 TC on 4 March 1944. To Central Aircraft in London, Ontario from 26 May to 17 July 1944. To stored reserve with No. 1 TC when completed, issued to a unit on 2 November 1944. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. Available for disposal from 1 October 1945, when it had 518:10 airframe time. Stored post war at Jarvis, Ontario.

last date: 10 December 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 22 December 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Inspected on 22 March 1943, when it had 85:50 airframe time. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. To stored reserve 24 February 1945. Stored post war at No. 404 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit at Jarvis, Ontario. Had 914:35 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 10 December 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 23 December 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Inspected on 22 March 1943, when it had 58:55 airframe time. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. To No. 5 Repair Depot on 25 January 1945 for write off.

last date: 21 March 1945 - Struck off, reduced to spares and produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 24 December 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered new to No. 1 Bombing & Gunnery School at Jarvis, Ontario. Inspected on 22 March 1943, when it had 50:20 airframe time. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. To No. 6 Repair Depot on 7 February 1945 for write off.

last date: 26 March 1945 - Struck off, reduced to spares and produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 26 December 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Inspected on 23 March 1943, when it had 99:50 airframe time. Assigned to Central Aircraft of London, Ontario on 13 March 1944, following a crash. To No. 6 Repair Depot at RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario for conversion to a target tug on 26 June 1944. To Western Air Command on 14 September 1944. Noted on 20 October 1944 as "requires extensive work on installation of operational equipment." To workshop reserve at RCAF Station Patricia Bay, BC from 26 October 1944 to 25 June 1945. Category A crash while with Western Air Command, date unknown.

last date: 1 November 1946 - Struck off

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 22 December 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

To No. 2 Training Command on 16 January 1943. At No. 8 Repair Depot from 19 May 1943 to 7 February 1944. To No. 2 Training Command when completed. Category A crash on 19 August 1944, while with No. 3 Bombing & Gunnery School at RCAF Station MacDonald, Manitoba. Destroyed by post crash fire. Assigned to No. 8 RD for write off on 21 August 1944.

last date: 13 September 1944 - Struck off after crash, see comments

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 23 December 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Inspected on 22 March 1943, when it had 48:40 airframe time. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. To stored reserve on 24 February 1945. Stored post war by No. 6 Repair Depot at Jarvis, Ontario. Had 902:15 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 10 December 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 24 December 1942 - Taken on strength

Accepted by No.1 Training Command, for use at No. 1 Bombing & Gunnery School at Jarvis, Ontario. Inspected on 22 March 1943, when it had 86:20 airframe time. To Central Aircraft at London, Ontario for repairs 30 June 1943 to 10 April 1944, for repairs following a Category B crash. To No. 3 TC when complete, reported at No. 10 B&GS at Mount Pleasant, PEI on 16 May 1944. Reported as fitted with dual controls on 17 May 1944. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. To stored reserve with Eastern Air Command on 20 June 1945. Available for disposal from 24 October 1945. Stored at Mont Joli, PQ by 27 November 1945.

last date: 6 January 1947 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 26 December 1942 - Taken on strength

Accepted by No.1 Training Command, for use at No. 1 Bombing & Gunnery School at Jarvis, Ontario. Inspected on 22 March 1943, airframe time was 82:05. To No. 6 Repair Depot on 12 August 1943 for write off. Fuselage became instructional aid A335 on 3 November 1943 after aircraft was broken up. Used by No. 1 Training Command. Fuselage disposed of 8 July 1948.

last date: 3 September 1943 - Struck off, reduced to spares and produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 28 December 1942 - Taken on strength

Delivered to stored reserve with No. 4 Training Command. Issued to school on 4 February 1943. Stored reserve from 5 August 1943 to 1 March 1944. Loaned to W.H.O. from this date to 24 July 1944, then back to stored reserve with No. 4 TC. To No. 2 Air Command, still in storage, on 1 December 1944. Available for disposal from 23 March 1945. Had 279:05 airframe time when struck off. Stored post war by No. 10 Repair Depot.

last date: 21 July 1947 - Struck off

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 27 January 1943 - Taken on strength

Accepted by No. 8 Repair Depot at Winnipeg. To No. 2 Training Command on 6 March 1943, to stored reserve. Issued to school on 17 April 1943. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To stored reserve 2 February 1945, available for disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored post war at MacDonald, Manitoba, under charge of No. 10 Repair Depot. Had 899:55 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 15 May 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 30 December 1942 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength by No. 2 Training Command. To No. 8 Repair Depot on 7 June 1944 for conversion to target tug, completed 21 July 1944. To No. 2 TC when completed, then to No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To stored reserve on 2 February 1945. Available for disposal from 13 October 1945. Stored post war at MacDonald, Manitoba. Had 645:30 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 15 May 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 31 December 1942 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength by No. 2 Training Command. To stored reserve from 27 April to 8 June 1944. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To stored reserve on 14 February 1945. Available for disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored post war at Paulson, Manitoba. Had 900:45 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 21 August 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 1 January 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength by No. 2 Training Command. To stored reserve 14 June 1943. To No. 3 Bombing & Gunnery School at MacDonald, Manitoba on 4 January 1944. To No. 8 Repair Depot at Winnipeg on 7 June 1944 for conversion to target tug, completed on 24 July 1944. Back to No. 2 TC when completed, to No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To stored reserve on 2 February 1945. Available for disposal from 13 October 1945. Stored post war at MacDonald, under charge of No. 10 Repair Depot. Had 499:55 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 15 May 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 2 January 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength by No. 2 Training Command. To stored reserve 14 June 1943. To No. 3 Bombing & Gunnery School at MacDonald, Manitoba on 4 January 1944. To No. 8 Repair Depot at Winnipeg on 9 June 1944 for conversion to target tug, completed on 24 July 1944. Back to No. 2 TC when completed, to No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To stored reserve on 2 February 1945. Available for disposal from 13 October 1945. Stored post war with No. 3 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit at MacDonald, under charge of No. 10 Repair Depot. Had 343:20 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 15 May 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 11 February 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength by No. 4 Training Command. With No. 2 Air Command from 1 December 1944. To stored reserve on that day. Available for disposal from 12 (or 13?) October 1945. Stored post war at MacDonald, Manitoba. Had 973:20 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 15 May 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 8 February 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength by No. 3 Training Command, after a Category C crash en route to No. 4 Training Command on 8 February 1943. To No. 4 Training Command on 5 March 1943. Category A crash on 16 November 1943, while with No. 4 Training Command.

last date: 8 April 1944 - Struck off after crash, reduced to spares and produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 9 January 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered to stored reserve with No. 2 Training Command. Issued to a school on 17 February 1943. To No. 8 Repair Depot for write off on 10 March 1944.

last date: 14 April 1944 - Struck off

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 11 January 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered to stored reserve with No. 2 Training Command. Issued to a unit on 8 March 1943. To No. 8 Repair Depot for storage on 30 August 1943. Converted to target tug, back to No. 2 TC on 12 June 1944. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To stored reserve on 7 February 1945. Available for disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored post war at Paulson, Manitoba. Had 277:50 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 21 August 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 11 January 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered new to long term storage with No. 2 Training Command. Issued on 9 March 1943. To No. 8 Repair Depot for write off on 30 November 1944.

last date: 11 December 1944 - Struck off after crash, retained in whole state

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 20 January 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered new to long term storage with No. 2 Training Command. Issued on 9 March 1943. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To stored reserve on 13 January 1945. Available for disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored post war at MacDonald, Manitoba. Had 815:15 airframe time when struck off. Pieces owned post war by W. Agnew of Hartley, Manitoba. Sold to J. Coussens of Springfield, MO in 1988. Stored in pieces at Springfield, together with some pieces of Bolingbrokes 9991 and 10223.

last date: 15 May 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 20 January 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered new to stored reserve with No. 2 Training Command. Issued on 17 February 1943. Completely destroyed in Category A crash on 15 April 1944, while with No. 2 Training Command. To No. 8 Repair Depot for write off on 18 April 1944.

last date: 14 May 1944 - Struck off after crash, reduced to produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 21 January 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered new to stored reserve with No. 2 Training Command. Issued on 1 March 1943. With No. 2 Training Command when it crashed and was completely destroyed. To No. 8 Repair Depot on 7 August 1943 for write off.

last date: 11 October 1943 - Struck off, reduced to spares and produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 21 January 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered new to stored reserve with No. 2 Training Command. Issued on 17 February 1943. To stored reserve from 14 June to 16 August 1943. Transferred to No. 2 Air Command in December 1944. To storage on 7 February 1945, at RCAF Station Paulson, Manitoba. Had 643:10 airframe time when struck off, and had never been overhauled. Sold to local farmer, stored outdoors for many years. Sold to D. Tallichat of Chino, California 1972, delivered to Ontario, California by rail. Stored outdoors, with wings attached, 1987 to 2001. To General Patton Army Airfield Group at Chiriaco, California in 2001. With Bristol Heritage Collection, Nashville, TN in 2005, awaiting restoration.

last date: 21 August 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets for sale.

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 22 January 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered new to stored reserve with No. 2 Training Command. Issued on 9 March 1943. To stored reserve 14 June to 16 August 1943. Back to stored reserve on 17 May 1944. Served with No. 3 Bombing and Gunnery School at MacDonald, Manitoba from 1 August 1944. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. Available for disposal from 18 January 1945. Had 709:00 airframe time when struck off. Sold to local farmer, A. Beauman. To J. Spinks of Lethbridge, Alberta in 1991. Stored as hulk. Reported stored near Nanton, Alberta in 1999.

last date: 1 October 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 23 January 1943 - Taken on strength

Built with Mercury XX Star engines. Delivered new to stored reserve with No. 4 Training Command. Issued on 20 February 1943. To stored reserve on 17 April 1944. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944, still in storage. Available for disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored post war at No. 3 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit at MacDonald, Manitoba. Had 480:15 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 15 May 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 25 January 1943 - Taken on charge

Built with Mercury XX Star engines. Delivered to stored reserve at No. 4 Training Command in western Canada, first assigned to a school on 18 March 1943. Sent for repairs in early 1944, no details. Allocated to No. 8 Repair Depot on 2 June 1944 for conversion to target tug, completed on 11 August 1944. Assigned to No. 2 TC, also in western Canada. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. In storage from 14 February 1945, at RCAF Station Paulson, Manitoba. Available for disposal from 12 October 1945. Had 494:20 airframe time when struck off, had never been overhauled. Sold to local farmer. To David Tallichet in 1972, in storage at Chino, California by 1987. Sold to G. Kilsby and the Bristol Heritage Collection in 1999. With Bristol Heritage Collection, Nashville, TN in 2005, awaiting restoration.

last date: 21 August 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets for sale.

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 11 February 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength by No. 4 Training Command. Category B crash on 17 August 1944, while with No. 8 Bombing and Gunnery School at Lethbridge, Alberta. To Aircraft Repair Co. on 21 August 1944. To No. 10 Repair Depot on 13 October 1944. Not clear if repairs finished before aircraft was struck off. Application for write off dated 29 November 1944.

last date: 22 February 1945 - Struck off, retained in whole state

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 11 February 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength by No. 4 Training Command. With No. 8 Bombing & Gunnery School at Lethbridge, Alberta from 1 June 1943. To workshop reserve at this school on 1 June 1943 following a crash, and pending allocation for repairs. Scheduled for Canadian Pacific Airlines at Vancouver from 4 January 1944, but re-allocated to Aircraft Repair Co. on 16 February 1944. Back to No. 4 TC, stored reserve, on 2 November 1944. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944, still in storage. Available for disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored post war at MacDonald, Manitoba. Had 184:10 airframe time when struck off. Remains purchased by W. Agnew of Hartney, Manitoba by 1975. To V. O'Conner of Uxbridge, Ontario in 1988. Pieces stored outdoors as late as 2000, with original yellow paint still visible.

last date: 15 May 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 28 January 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered to stored reserve at Calgary, Alberta with No. 4 Training Command. First issued on 18 March 1943. With No. 2 Air Command from 1 December 1944. To stored reserve on 24 January 1945. Available for disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored post war at Paulson, Manitoba. Had 1078:05 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 21 August 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 2 February 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered new to No. 31 Bombing & Gunnery School at Picton, Ontario. To stored reserve on 9 March 1944. To No. 6 Repair Depot at RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario for repairs on 27 April 1944. To stored reserve with No. 1 Air Command on 19 April 1945. In storage at Jarvis, Ontario from 27 November 1945. Available for disposal there from 2 March 1946. Had 431:30 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 10 December 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 2 February 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered to long term storage, then to No. 31 Bombing & Gunnery School at Picton, Ontario. To stored reserve with No. 1 Training Command on 9 March 1944. To Central Aircraft at Crumlin (London), Ontario on 26 May 1944, back to stored reserve on 7 August 1944. Issued to school on 2 November 1944. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. To stored reserve on 6 March 1945. Stored post war at No. 404 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit. Had 457:20 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 10 December 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 2 February 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered to stored reserve with No. 1 Training Command, issued on 13 March 1943. With No. 6 Bombing and Gunnery School at Mountain View, Ontario in mid 1943. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. Available for disposal from 3 December 1945, when it was stored at Jarvis, Ontario.

last date: 10 December 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 2 February 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered to stored reserve with No. 1 Training Command, issued on 13 March 1943. With No. 6 Bombing and Gunnery School at Mountain View, Ontario in mid 1943. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. Available for disposal from 3 December 1945, when it was stored at Jarvis, Ontario.

last date: 10 December 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 2 February 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered to stored reserve with No. 1 Training Command, issued on 25 March 1943. With No. 6 Bombing and Gunnery School at RCAF Station Mountain View, Ontario in mid 1943. Category A crash at Mountain View. To No. 6 Repair Depot at Trenton on 22 October 1943, for write off.

last date: 19 November 1943 - Struck off after crash, reduced to spares and produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 9 March 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength at No. 4 Repair Depot, Scoudouc, NB. Converted to target tug while there. Issued to No. 34 Operational Training Unit at Pennfield Ridge, NB on 21 August 1943. To No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mount Pleasant, PEI on 3 May 1944. To No. 4 RD for write off on 16 November 1944, after Category A crash at Petpeswick, NS (20 miles east of Dartmouth). Disposed of on site.

last date: 5 January 1945 - Struck off

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 9 March 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength at No. 4 Repair Depot, Scoudouc, NB. Converted to target tug while there. Issued to Eastern Air Command on 27 May 1943. Used as target tug by No. 121 (K) Squadron, RCAF Station Dartmouth, NS, c.1943 to 1944. To stored reserve on 8 August 1945. Available for disposal from 5 January 1946, when it was stored at No. 6 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit.

last date: 25 November 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 9 March 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength at No. 4 Repair Depot, Scoudouc, NB. Converted to target tug while there. Issued to Eastern Air Command on 27 May 1943. Used as target tug by No. 121 (K) Squadron, RCAF Station Dartmouth, NS, c.1943 to 1944. To No. 9 Repair Depot on 24 October 1944. Reassigned to No. 6 RD at Trenton on 2 January 1945, for redoping. To stored reserve with No. 1 Air Command on 29 March 1945. In storage at Jarvis, Ontario by 27 November 1945. Available for disposal at this location from 5 March 1946. Had 249:50 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 10 December 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 9 March 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength at No. 4 Repair Depot, Scoudouc, NB. Converted to target tug while there. Issued to No. 3 Training Command on 20 October 1943, for use at No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mount Pleasant, PEI. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. To stored reserve with Eastern Air Command on 20 June 1945. Available for disposal from 27 November 1945, when it was stored at Mont Joli, PQ. Later stored at Mount Pleasant, PEI.

last date: 6 January 1947 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 9 March 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength at No. 4 Repair Depot, Scoudouc, NB. Converted to target tug while there. Issued to No. 3 Training Command on 20 October 1943, for use at No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mount Pleasant, PEI. To No. 4 Repair Depot on 3 March 1944 for salvage, probably following a crash. To No. 9 Repair Depot on 9 October 1944. Available for disposal from 8 January 1945, still at No. 9 RD. Had 98:45 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 30 June 1947 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale.

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 9 March 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength at No. 4 Repair Depot, Scoudouc, NB. Converted to target tug while there. Issued to No. 3 Training Command on 20 October 1943, for use at No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mount Pleasant, PEI. Still with No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School when it suffered a Category A crash on 16 August 1944. Transferred to No. 4 RD on 22 August 1944 for write off.

last date: 15 September 1944 - Struck off

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 9 March 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength at No. 4 Repair Depot, Scoudouc, NB. Converted to target tug while there. Issued to No. 3 Training Command on 20 October 1943, for use at No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mount Pleasant, PEI. Category B crash in early 1944. Repaired at the school by a work party from Fairchild Aircraft, from 17 June 1944 to 5 February 1945. To No. 1 Air Command on 5 February 1945. To stored reserve with Eastern Air Command on 20 June 1945. Stored post war at Mt. Pleasant, PEI. Had 176:40 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 8 January 1947 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 9 March 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength at No. 4 Repair Depot, Scoudouc, NB. Converted to target tug while there. Issued to No. 3 Training Command on 20 October 1943, for use at No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mount Pleasant, PEI. To stored reserve with Eastern Air Command on 20 June 1945. Available for disposal from 24 October 1945. Stored post war at Mont Joli, PQ and Mt. Pleasant, PEI.

last date: 6 January 1947 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 9 March 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength by No. 4 Repair Depot, Scoudouc, NB. Converted to target tug while there. To No. 3 Training Command on 20 October 1943. Back to No. 4 RD on 2 December 1943, probably following a Category B crash. To no. 9 Repair Depot on 16 October 1944. To stored reserve with No. 1 Training Command on 2 January 1945. To No. 1 Air Command, still in storage, on 15 January 1945. Available for disposal at Jarvis, Ontario from 8 April 1946. Reported as equipped with Mercury XX Star engines at that time. Noted on 24 April 1946 as "to be retained in the RCAF for purposes of public display", but not followed through.

last date: 10 December 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 9 March 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength at No. 4 Repair Depot, Scoudouc, NB. Converted to target tug while there. Issued to No. 3 Training Command on 20 October 1943, for use at No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mount Pleasant, PEI. Category A crash late 1944, disposed of on site. Ownership to No. 4 RD for write off on 16 November 1944. Had one Mercury XX Star and one Mercury XX engine when struck off.

last date: 9 January 1945 - Struck off

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 15 February 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength at No. 4 Repair Depot, Scoudouc, NB. Converted to target tug while there. Issued to No. 3 Training Command on 20 October 1943. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. To stored reserve with Eastern Air Command on 20 June 1945. Available for disposal from 24 October 1945. Stored at No. 6 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit at Mont Joli, PQ on 27 November 1945. Later at Mt. Pleasant, PEI.

last date: 6 January 1947 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 15 February 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered to stored reserve with Eastern Air Command, issued on 2 September 1943. Used for maintenance training, pending delivery of target tug aircraft to EAC. To No. 9 Repair Depot at St Johns on 18 April 1944. To stored reserve with No. 2 Training Command on 2 November 1944. To No. 2 Air Command, still in storage, on 1 December 1944. Available for disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored post war at No. 3 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit at MacDonald, Manitoba. Had 97:30 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 15 May 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 15 February 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered to stored reserve with Eastern Air Command, issued on 24 September 1943. Used for maintenance training, pending delivery of target tug aircraft to EAC. To No. 9 Repair Depot at St Johns on 18 August 1944. To No. 1 Training Command on 9 December 1944, to stored reserve. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945, still in storage. Stored at Jarvis, Ontario from 27 April 1945. Available for disposal there from 5 March 1946. Had 36:05 airframe time when struck off.

last date: 10 December 1946 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 15 February 1943 - Taken on strength

Delivered to stored reserve with Eastern Air Command, equipped with Mercury XV engines. Issued to No. 3 Training Command on 20 October 1943, for use at No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mount Pleasant, PEI. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. Category A crash at 15:45 on 2 May 1945, at Enmore, PEI, still with No. 10 B&GS. Equipped with Mercury XX Star engines when struck off.

last date: 22 June 1945 - Struck off

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 15 February 1943 - Taken on strength

Taken on strength by Eastern Air Command, placed in stored reserve. To No. 3 Training Command on 20 October 1943, for use at No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mount Pleasant, PEI. Crashed mid 1944, repaired on site at the School from 5 to 8 July 1944. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. To stored reserve with EAC on 20 June 1945. Available for disposal from 24 October 1945. Stored post war at Mont Joli, PQ and Mt. Pleasant, PEI.

last date: 6 January 1947 - Struck off, to War Assets Corporation for sale


Bristol (Fairchild) Bolingbroke - History

Canadian Military Aircraft
Serial Numbers
RCAF 9850 to 9899
Detailed List

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 28 March 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 3 Training Command

Fitted with long range tanks. Allocated to the Test and Development Establishment at RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ontario on 28 March 1942, for cabin heating experiments. Category A crash at 16:15 on 13 May 1942, when both engines failed on take-off from Rockcliffe. Landed gear up on rough ground off end of runway, not repaired. To No. 9 Repair Depot for scrapping.

last date: 19 August 1942 - Struck off, reduced to spares and produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 4 April 1942 - Taken in strength by No. 1 Training Command

Suffered minor damage at St. Hubert aerodrome at 16:45 on 7 March 1942, reported by No. 13 Service Flying Training School. Delivered to long term storage after this, then issued to No. 1 Training Command on 30 September 1942. To storage on 9 March 1944. To Central Aircraft in Crumlin, Ontario, 26 May to 28 September 1944. To storage with No. 1 Training Command when completed. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945, still in storage. Stored at the Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite at Jarvis, Ontario. Pending disposal from 5 March 1946, still at Jarvis. Noted on that date with 256:40 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 10 December 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 7 April 1942 - Taken in strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To workshop reserve at No. 6 Repair Depot on 2 June 1944, for conversion to target tower. To storage with No. 1 Training Command on 1 December 1944. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945, still in storage. By 27 November 1945 on the books of Maintenance Command, stored at the Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite at Jarvis, Ontario. Pending disposal from 4 March 1946, still at Jarvis. Noted on that date with 5:00 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 10 December 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 10 April 1942 - Taken in strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To workshop reserve at No. 6 Repair Depot on 2 June 1944. To No. 3 Training Command on 9 August 1944, after conversion to target tug. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. Category A crash at Mt. Pleasant, PEI. Ownership to No. 4 Repair Depot fro write off, scrapped on site.

last date: 12 February 1945 - Written off

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 13 April 1942 - Taken in strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To workshop reserve at No. 6 Repair Depot on 2 June 1944, for conversion to target tower. To storage with No. 1 Air Command on 29 January 1945. By 27 November 1945 on the books of Maintenance Command, stored at the Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite at Jarvis, Ontario. Pending disposal from 4 March 1946, still at Jarvis. Noted on that date with 5:45 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 10 December 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 17 April 1942 - Taken in strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 25 October 1943. To No. 3 Training Command on 15 May 1944. With No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mount Pleasant, P.E.I. when it suffered a Category A crash on 4 July 1944. Crashed on takeoff from Mt. Pleasant on a training flight, when pilot left engine cooling flaps open. Lone occupant, an RCAF pilot, was not injured. To No. 4 Repair Depot for write off on 15 July 1944.

last date: 15 September 1944 - Written off

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 20 April 1942 - Taken in strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 16 August 1943. To No. 2 Training Command on 22 January 1944, for use by No. 3 Bombing & Gunnery School at MacDonald, Manitoba. Still with that School when it suffered Category C damage on 19 September 1944. Damaged after port engine caught fire during a training flight. Cause of fire was tracked to a failed diaphragm in an engine mounted fuel regulator valve, resulting in fuel being sprayed on the exhaust manifold. Later re-categorized to Category A damage. RCAF pilot seriously injured while exiting the aircraft on the ground, other 3 occupants not injured. As a result of this accident the overhaul of the fuel valve in question at 1,000 operating hours was changed to an inspection every 40 hours, plus complete replacement of the valve at 1,000 operating hours. Application to write off from No. 8 Repair Depot dated 20 September 1944. Retained in whole state after write off.

last date: 27 October 1944 - Written off

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 23 April 1942 - Taken in strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 6 Repair Depot on 2 June 1944 for conversion to target tug. To storage with No. 1 Training Command on 1 January 1945. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945, still in storage. By 27 November 1945 on the books of Maintenance Command, stored at the Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite at Jarvis, Ontario. Noted on 3 March 1946 with 5:45 logged time, never overhauled. Pending disposal from 4 March 1946, still at Jarvis.

last date: 10 December 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 25 April 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 6 Repair Depot at Trenton

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 28 January 1943, for use by No. 6 Bombing and Gunnery School at Mountain View, Ontario. Still there in mid 1943. To Central Aircraft at Crumlin, Ontario 21 May to 11 October 1944. To storage with No. 1 Training Command when completed. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945, still in storage. By 27 November 1945 on the books of Maintenance Command, stored at the Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite at Jarvis, Ontario. Pending disposal from 3 March 1946, still at Jarvis. Noted on 5 March 1946 with 354:20 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 10 December 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 25 April 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 6 Repair Depot at Trenton

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 25 March 1943, to No. 1 Training Command. To No. 6 Repair Depot on 22 April 1943, for inspection and report following an accident. To No. 3 training Command in December 1943, for use by No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mount Pleasant, P.E.I. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. To storage with Eastern Air Command on 20 June 1945. By 27 November 1945 on the books of Maintenance Command, stored at the Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite at Mt. Pleasant.

last date: 8 January 1947 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 25 April 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 6 Repair Depot at Trenton

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 12 December 1942, to No. 1 Training Command. To Central Aircraft at Crumlin, Ontario on 5 March 1943, for repairs. To No. 2 Training Command on 18 January 1944, for use by No. 3 Bombing & Gunnery School at MacDonald, Manitoba. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To storage on 10 February 1945. Pending disposal from 13 October 1945. Stored by Maintenance Command at MacDonald, where it was noted with 473:00 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 15 May 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 27 April 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 6 Repair Depot on 2 June 1944, for conversion to target tug. To be allocated to stored reserve with No. 1 Training Command on 13 December 1944, but this was cancelled. Request to scrap from No. 6 Repair Depot dated 22 February 1945.

last date: 17 March 1945 - Struck off, reduced to spares and produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 29 April 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 28 January 1943, for use by No. 31 Bombing and Gunnery School at Picton, Ontario. To Central Aircraft at Crumlin, Ontario on 26 May 1944. To No. 6 Repair Depot on 18 August 1944, for conversion to target tug. To storage with No. 1 Air Command on 29 January 1945. Stored at No. 404 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit at Jarvis, Ontario, where it was noted with 329:50 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 10 December 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 30 April 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 19 December 1942. To No. 6 Repair Depot on 24 July 1943, following a Category B crash. To Central Aircraft for crash repairs on 28 February 1944. To No. 6 Repair Depot on 23 May 1944 for conversion to target tug. To Western Air Command on 14 September 1944. Western Air Command memo of 20 October 1944 stated "This aircraft requires extensive work on installation of operational equipment." To workshop reserve at RCAF Station Patricia Bay on that date. Pending disposal from October 1945. By 1 May 1946 on the books of Maintenance Command, stored by No. 10 Repair Depot at Patricia Bay. Noted with 179:05 total time, never overhauled, while stored at Patricia Bay.

last date: 13 September 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 2 April 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 28 January 1943, for use by No. 6 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mountain View, Ontario. To No. 3 Training Command on 15 May 1944, for use by No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mt. Pleasant, PEI. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. Classified as Category A by 9 March 1945. To No. 4 Repair Depot on 14 March 1945, for scrapping after a Category A crash at Mt. Pleasant.

last date: 19 April 1945 - Written off,

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 30 April 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 6 Repair Depot on 2 June 1944, for conversion to target tug. To storage with No. 1 Training Command on 13 December 1944. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 December 1945, still in storage. By 27 November 1945 on the books of Maintenance Command, stored at the Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite at Jarvis, Ontario. Noted on 4 March 1946 with 3:20 logged time, never overhauled. Pending disposal from 6 March 1946, still at Jarvis.

last date: 10 December 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 1 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 12 December 1942. Category A damage on 16 July 1943, while with No. 31 Bombing & Gunnery School at Picton, Ontario. Pilot aborted an attempted takeoff on a maintenance check flight when aircraft was not accelerating sufficiently, over ran the end of the runway. All 4 occupants uninjured. To No. 6 Repair Depot for scrapping on 22 July 1943.

last date: 2 September 1943 - Struck off, reduced to spares and produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 2 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 12 December 1942. To storage on 16 March 1944. To No. 6 Repair Depot on 17 June 1944, for conversion to target tug. To storage with No. 1 Air Command on 9 February 1945. Stored at No. 404 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite at Jarvis, Ontario, where it was noted with 335:10 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 10 December 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 4 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 21 February 1944, still in storage. To No. 8 Repair Depot on 7 June 194, for conversion to target tug. To No. 2 Training Command on 21 June 1944. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To storage on 8 March 1945. Pending disposal from 2 January 1946, when it was stored at the Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite at MacDonald, Manitoba.

last date: 15 May 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 5 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 7 January 1944, for use by No. 3 Bombing & Gunnery School at MacDonald, Manitoba. To storage on 22 June 1944. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944, still in storage. Pending disposal from 13 October 1945. Stored at MacDonald, Manitoba, where it was noted with 35:20 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 15 May 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 6 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 19 December 1942. To Central Aircraft at Crumlin, Ontario for crash repairs, 23 March 1943 to 13 March 1944. To storage with No. 1 Training Command when completed. Issued from storage on 15 August 1944, for use by No. 1 Bombing & Gunnery School at Jarvis, Ontario. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. To storage on 24 February 1945. Stored at No. 404 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite at Jarvis, where it was noted with 253:00 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 10 December 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 16 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 18 February 1943. With No. 6 Bombing and Gunnery School at Mountain View, Ontario in mid 1943. To No. 3 Training Command on 15 May 1944, for use by No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mount Pleasant, PEI. Category A crash on 28 October 1944, during a gunnery exercise from Mt. Pleasant. Came down in woods 4 miles south-west of aerodrome, killing P/O L.B. Armstrong and LAC J.O.R.E.Y. Girard. Ownership to No. 4 Repair Depot on 11 November 1944. Reduced to scrap at the crash site.

last date: 6 December 1944 - Struck off

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 18 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 12 December 1942. Crashed on 23 June 1943, while with No. 6 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mountain View, Ontario. Starboard propeller came off during firing exercises, due to a failure in the reduction gearbox. Pilot attempted to return to Mountain View, but realized he could not maintain altitude and so attempted a forced landing short of the field. Swerved to avoid trees on landing, wing tip dug in and aircraft ground looped. Destroyed by post-crash fire. Pilot seriously injured, other 3 occupants not injured. To No. 6 Repair Depot for scrapping on 28 June 1943.

last date: 6 July 1943 - Struck off, reduced to spares and produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 16 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 22 March 1943. To storage on 16 March 1944. Assigned to Central Aircraft on 26 May 1944. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945, noted as in storage on that date. Issued from storage on 25 January 1945. With Air Armament School at Mountain View, Ontario when it was damaged in a ground loop on take off from Mountain View, after main gear collapsed, on 8 November 1945. To workshop reserve at No. 6 Repair Depot on 11 December 1945.

last date: 19 December 1945 - Struck off, reduced to spares and produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 16 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 20 October 1942. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To storage on 14 February 1945. Pending disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored at Paulson, Manitoba, where it was noted with 1060:45 total time, never overhauled.

last date: 21 August 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 16 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 4 Training Command on 20 October 1942, for use by No. 8 Bombing & Gunnery School at Lethbridge, Alberta. Fitted with dual controls by 5 June 1943. Blew a tire and ground looped on landing at Lethbridge on 15 June 1944, then caught fire. To No. 10 Repair Depot on 22 June 1944 for inspection.

last date: 4 October 1944 - Approval to scrap issued

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 16 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 20 October 1942. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To storage on 7 February 1945. Pending disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored at Paulson, Manitoba, where it was noted with 832:25 total time, never overhauled.

last date: 21 August 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 16 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 30 September 1942. To No. 3 Training Command on 15 May 1944, for use by No. 10 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mt. Pleasant, PEI. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. To storage with Eastern Air Command on 20 June 1945. Pending disposal from 24 October 1945. By 27 November 1945 on the books of Maintenance Command, stored by No. 6 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit at the Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite at Mt. Pleasant.

last date: 6 January 1947 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 18 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 30 September 1942. To storage on 5 October 1943. Issued from storage on 4 January 1944, for use by No. 3 Bombing & Gunnery School at MacDonald, Manitoba. Involved in a Category B crash on 16 October 1944 at MacDonald, later revised to Category A damage. Right wing dropped shortly after takeoff and pilot was unable to raise it. Believing he had lost lateral control the pilot closed the throttles and attempted to abort the takeoff. He overran the field, passed through the boundary fence and boundary road, and came to rest in a ditch. Investigation suspected slip stream from a Hurricane taking off before the Bolingbroke may have contributed. All 4 occupants uninjured. To No. 8 Repair Depot on 21 October 1944, for write off action. Retained in whole state after write off.

last date: 20 November 1944 - Written off

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 19 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 20 October 1942. To Trans Canada Airlines for repairs, 6 January to 23 November 1943. To storage with No. 2 Training Command when completed. Issued from storage on 4 January 1944, for use by No. 3 Bombing & Gunnery School at MacDonald, Manitoba. To storage on 17 May 1944. To No. 8 Repair Depot for conversion to target tug on 7 June 1944. To storage with No. 2 Training Command on 3 August 1944, issued from storage on 6 November 1944. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. Pending disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored at Paulson, Manitoba, where it was noted with 1210:45 total time, never overhauled.

last date: 21 August 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 20 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 20 October 1942. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To storage on 28 February 1945. Pending disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored at MacDonald, Manitoba. Noted with 867:40 total time, never overhauled, while in storage.

last date: 15 August 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 21 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 20 October 1942. With No. 5 Bombing & Gunnery School at Dafoe, Saskatchewan when it spun in and crashed on 24 May 1944. The aircraft was seen to have climbed steeply at between 3 and 4 thousand feet, then stall and go into a spin. It recovered just before it hit the ground at 09:30 hours and subsequently crashed 6 miles south-west of Dafoe. PO F.L. Butcher, LAC S. Newton, RAF, LAC S.E. Steeden and W.O. W.D. Mitchell killed. To No. 8 Repair Depot on 29 May 1944 for scrapping.

last date: 13 June 1944 - Struck off, reduced to spares and produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 22 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 20 October 1942. With No. 3 Bombing & Gunnery School at MacDonald, Manitoba when it crashed on the runway at MacDonald on 19 May 1944. Engine failed on lift off for a gunnery exercise, pilot stalled the aircraft, undercarriage collapsed on touch down. All 3 occupants uninjured. To No. 8 Repair Depot on 22 May 1944 for scrapping.

last date: 6 June 1944 - Struck off, reduced to spares and produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 23 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 30 September 1942. With No. 7 Air Observers School at Portage la Prairie in December 1943. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. Pending disposal from 16 December 1944. Stored at No. 205 Equipment Holding Unit, where it was noted with 917:50 logged time.

last date: 9 July 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 25 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 30 September 1942. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To storage on 7 February 1945. Pending disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored at Paulson, Manitoba, where it was noted with 778:00 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 21 August 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 26 May 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 30 September 1942. To workshop reserve at No. 8 Repair Depot on 9 May 1943. To storage with No. 2 Training Command on 15 September 1943, issued from storage on 5 October 1943. To storage again on 17 May 1944, issued from storage on 7 November 1944. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To storage on 2 February 1945. Pending disposal from 13 October 1945. Stored at MacDonald, Manitoba, where it was noted with 575:50 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 15 May 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 1 June 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. Issued from storage on 19 December 1942. Category B crash at Mountain View at 10:40 on 2 March 1943. To Central Aircraft at Crumlin, Ontario for repairs, 9 March to 29 September 1943. To storage with No. 1 Training Command when completed. Issued from storage on 1 February 1944, to No. 2 Training Command for use by No. 3 Bombing & Gunnery School at MacDonald, Manitoba. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To storage on 10 February 1945. Pending disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored at MacDonald, where it was noted with 463:05 logged time, 311:15 since overhaul.

last date: 15 May 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 1 June 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Fitted with dual controls. Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 30 September 1942. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To storage on 12 February 1945. Pending disposal from 13 October 1945. Stored at MacDonald, Manitoba, where it was noted with 952:30 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 15 May 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 3 June 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 30 September 1942. Fitted with dual controls by 3 May 1943. With No. 5 Bombing & Gunnery School at Dafoe, Saskatchewan when it suffered a Category A crash at 15:40 on 5 April 1944. Lone occupant, an RCAF pilot on a training flight, abandoned the aircraft after being unable to recover from an inverted spin. To No. 8 Repair Depot for scrapping on 17 April 1944.

last date: 27 April 1944 - Written off

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 3 June 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 30 September 1942. Dual controls installed by 3 May 1943. Stored at Winnipeg, 17 to 28 July 1943, then back to No. 2 Training Command. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To storage on 2 February 1945. Pending disposal from 13 October 1945. Stored at MacDonald, Manitoba, where it was noted with 834:10 logged time, never overhauled. Parts from this aircraft being used to make a composite aircraft at the Canadian Warplanes Heritage Museum at Hamilton in 2016, to be marked 9023.

last date: 12 May 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 4 June 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 2 Training Command on 30 September 1942. Received minor damage on 12 April 1943, when it collided on the ground with Anson 8610 at Paulson. Collided with Lysander 2392 on 26 February 1944. Both aircraft with No. 7 Bombing & Gunnery School at Paulson, Manitoba. 4 fatalities in this aircraft, WO2 S.D. Gaunce RCAF, LAC J.H. Kinloch RAF, LAC T.M. Reid RAF, and Sgt. R.E. Pickard RAF. This aircraft reported as "completely destroyed". To No. 8 Repair Depot for scrapping in 4 March 1944.

last date: 26 April 1944 - Written off

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 4 June 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 4 Training Command on 13 July 1942. To workshop reserve at No. 8 Bombing & Gunnery School at Lethbridge, Alberta on 1 July 1943, pending allocation to repair facility. Allocated to Canadian Pacific Airlines for repairs on 4 January 1944, but diverted to Aircraft Repair on 16 February 1944. To storage with No. 2 Training Command on 17 September 1944, issued from storage on 7 November 1944. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To storage on 14 February 1945. Pending disposal from 12 October 1945. Stored at Paulson, Manitoba, where it was noted with 337:20 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 21 August 1945 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 5 June 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 4 Training Command on 13 July 1942. With No. 2 Bombing & Gunnery School at Mossbank, Saskatchewan when it suffered Category B damage at 17:35 on 2 February 1943, 1 mile north west of the Mossbank control tower. To Aircraft Repair in Edmonton for repairs, 18 February 1943. Dismantled by Aircraft Repair, shipped to Canadian Pacific Airlines on 6 November 1943. To storage with Western Air Command on 30 June 1944. Pending disposal from 15 September 1945. Noted on 1 May 1946 on the books of Maintenance Command, stored by No. 10 Repair Depot at Patricia Bay, where it was noted with 176:30 logged time, 2:25 since overhaul. Assigned to War Assets Corporation on 6 September 1946, but returned to the RCAF shortly after this. To workshop reserve at Calgary on 3 February 1964, probably for preparation for shipping to Rockcliffe. To RCAF Station Rockcliffe on 3 March 1964. Classified as museum display on 11 January 1965. Preserved today in National Air Museum, Rockcliffe.

last date: 25 February 1967 - Transferred to Department of Secretary of State

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 6 June 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 4 Training Command on 13 July 1942. Category C21 damage in a crash 12 miles south west of Lethbridge on 20 December 1942. To storage3 on 4 April 1944. Pending disposal from 13 October 1944. Stored by No. 10 Repair Depot at MacDonald, Manitoba, where it was noted with 695:00 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 13 May 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 8 June 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 4 Training Command on 13 July 1942. Dual controls installed by 5 June 1943. To storage on 24 April 1944. To No. 2 Training Command on 2 November 1944. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944. To storage on 2 February 1945. Pending disposal from October 1945. Stored by No. 10 Repair Depot at MacDonald, Manitoba, where it was noted with 626:20 logged time, never overhauled.

last date: 13 May 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 9 June 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 4 Training Command on 13 July 1942. To storage on 24 April 1944. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944, still in storage. Pending disposal from 13 October 1945. Stored by No. 10 Repair Depot at MacDonald, Manitoba, where it was noted with 245:20 logged time, never overhauled. Preserved, displayed in Belgium National Museum, marked as 10038.

last date: 15 May 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 10 October 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 4 Training Command on 13 July 1942, for use by No. 8 Bombing & Gunnery School at Lethbridge, Alberta. Pending disposal from 21 November 1944. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944, still pending disposal. Stored by Maintenance Command at No. 1 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit. Hulk acquired by RAF in 1974, and parts used to rebuild another Bolingbroke (reported as 13308?) Remains to Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC, stored there in 2010.

last date: 22 August 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 11 June 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 4 Training Command on 13 July 1942, for use by No. 8 Bombing & Gunnery School at Lethbridge, Alberta. To storage on 4 April 1944. To No. 2 Air Command on 1 December 1944, still in storage. Pending disposal from 28 March 1945.

last date: 21 March 1947 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 12 June 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 1 Training Command

Delivered to long term storage. To No. 4 Training Command on 13 July 1942, for use by No. 8 Bombing & Gunnery School at Lethbridge, Alberta. With No. 8 Bombing & Gunnery School at Lethbridge when it received Category C damage on 19 December 1942. Forced landing after one engine failed on take-off from an auxiliary field. (This may be typo in the accident report, no such accident recorded in 8 B&GS Daily Diary.) Still with No. 8 Bombing & Gunnery School when it crashed and burned at 11:45 on 20 December 1942, on a bombing range near Lethbridge aerodrome. 4 fatalities. Scrapped by No. 10 Repair Depot.

last date: 12 March 1943 - Written off, reduced to spares and produce

Fairchild Aircraft Ltd., Longueuil PQ

first date: 13 July 1942 - Taken on strength by No. 4 Training Command

Dual controls installed by 5 June 1943. To No. 1 Training Command on 1 November 1944. To No. 1 Air Command on 15 January 1945. By 3 December 1945 on the books of Maintenance Command, stored at the Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite at Jarvis, Ontario. Noted with 739:25 total time, never overhauled, while in storage.

last date: 10 December 1946 - To War Assets Corporation for disposal

This data has come from a variety of sources, and may contain all sorts of errors. In the future, I will add a complete list of references. For now, some recent Internet references can be found at the links below. I would welcome any corrections or additions you may have. Contact me using the link below.


The Bristol Freighter Type 170

Designed and built by the Bristol Aeroplane Company, a total of 214 Freighters, and its passenger variant the Wayfarer, were built and used by airlines and air forces across the world. This Freighter was ‘saved from the scrapheap’ and brought home from New Zealand in 2018 by our volunteers and hundreds of generous donors. The aircraft is one of only 11 Bristol Freighter’s remaining in the world and now the only one in the whole of Europe!

Thanks to your support, the Freighter is being safely stored and its condition assessed by the Aerospace Bristol team.

The plan is for the Freighter to be safely housed inside the new Conservation in Action workshop, for volunteers and apprentices to undergo work to conserve the aircraft for the future.


Watch the video: Young -v- Bristol Aeroplane Company (August 2022).