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Shackle ARS-9 - History

Shackle ARS-9 - History



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Shackle
(ARS-9: dp. 1,630 (f.); 1. 213'6", b. 39', dr. 13', s.
16.5 k.; cpl. 120; a. 4 40mm.; cl. Diver)

Shackle (ARS-9) was laid down on 26 October 1942 by the Basalt Rock Co., Napa, Calif., launched on 1 April 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Walker Cochran, and commissioned on 5 February 1944, Lt. Charles G. Jenkins, Jr., in command.

Following shakedown out of San Diego, Shackle proceeded to Pearl Harbor. In May, she continued west to Midway where she cleared the entrance channel of the wreckage of Macaw (ARS-11). She then returned to Hawaii; and, in late November, took ARP-24 in tow and again headed west. Brief duties at Eniwetok, Guam and Saipan followed; and, in late January 1945, she commenced preparations for the assault on Iwo Jima.

A unit of Task Force 51, she arrived in the Volcano Islands on 19 February and remained until 10 March. Having completed over 44 salvage and diving assignments, she then sailed for Ulithi to prepare for the Okinawa campaign. On 27 March, she departed the Carolines for the Ryukyus where, operating from Kerama Retto, she provided assistance to ships on the vulnerable screening stations in the Okinawa area and made repairs and pumped water from damaged ships in preparation for docking them. In May alone she provided salvage and repair assistance to 21 ships many of which were kamikaze victims.

On 1 July, Shackle joined Task Group 39.11, a minesweeping group; and, during that month, as area "Juneau" in the East China Sea was swept, she combined salvage and mine disposal duties. At the end of the month, she returned to Buckner Bay, where, on 12 August, she witnessed the torpedoing of Pennsylvania (BB-38) and immediately commenced salvage work on the damaged battleship. Three days later, the war ended.

Shackle remained in the Buckner Bay area until 20 September. She then sailed for Tokyo Bay where, into November, she was employed in clearing the docking area at Yokosuka. On the 27th, she started back across the Pacific. Salvage duties interrupted her voyage at Wake Island. At the end of December, she arrived at Pearl Harbor; and, in February 1946, continued on to the west coast. She remained at San Diego until ordered to San Francisco where, on 29 June, she was decommissioned and transferred to the United States Coast Guard.

Renamed Acushnet and designated WAT-167, later WMEC-167, she served the Coast Guard as a search and rescue ship into July 1968. Then redesignated an oceanographic ship, WAGO-167, and assigned to oceanographic, meteorologic, and polar operations, she commenced duties as a research support shin. During fiscal year 1970, she underwent conversion during which alterations were made to her hull and scientific equipment, and research and storage spaces were added. In July 1971, Acushnet transferred from the west coast to the gulf coast; and, based at Gulfport, Miss., has continued her oceanographic work into 1974.

Shackle (ARS-9) earned three battle stars during World War II.


World War II service [ edit | edit source ]

Following shakedown out of San Diego, California, Shackle proceeded to Pearl Harbor. In May, she continued west to Midway Island where she cleared the entrance channel of the wreckage of Macaw (ARS-11). She then returned to Hawaii and, in late November, took ARD-2H in tow and again headed west. Brief duties at Eniwetok, Guam, and Saipan followed and, in late January 1945, she commenced preparations for the assault on Iwo Jima.

Okinawa operations [ edit | edit source ]

A unit of Task Force 51, she arrived in the Volcano Islands on 19 February and remained until 10 March. Having completed over 44 salvage and diving assignments, she then sailed for Ulithi to prepare for the Okinawa campaign. On 27 March, she departed the Carolines for the Ryukyus where, operating from Kerama Retto, she provided assistance to ships on the vulnerable screening stations in the Okinawa area and made repairs and pumped water from damaged ships in preparation for docking them. In May alone, she provided salvage and repair assistance to 21 ships, many of which were kamikaze victims.

Minesweeping the East China Sea [ edit | edit source ]

On 1 July, Shackle joined Task Group 39.11, a mine-sweeping group and, during that month, as area "Juneau" in the East China Sea was swept, she combined salvage and mine disposal duties. At the end of the month, she returned to Buckner Bay, where, on 12 August, she witnessed the torpedoing of Pennsylvania and immediately commenced salvage work on the damaged battleship. Three days later, the war ended.

End-of-war activity [ edit | edit source ]

Shackle remained in the Buckner Bay area until 20 September. She then sailed for Tokyo Bay where, into November, she was employed in clearing the docking area at Yokosuka. On the 27th, she started back across the Pacific Ocean. Salvage duties interrupted her voyage at Wake Island. At the end of December, she arrived at Pearl Harbor and, in February 1946, continued on to the west coast.


Summary Edit

Basalt Rock Company U.S. Navy U.S. Navy Croteau, Todd, project manager US Coast Guard, sponsor

This tag does not indicate the copyright status of the attached work. A normal copyright tag is still required. See Commons:Licensing.

  • See also HAER AK-50 for similar documentation. Includes drawings, photographs, and written data.
  • See also HAER MI-121 for similar documentation. Includes drawings, photographs, and written data.
  • Significance: The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Acushnet currently holds the distinction as the &#147Queen of the Fleet,&#148 the oldest cutter in the Coast Guard. She has served her country for sixty-three years, beginning service during World War II as the USS Shackle (ARS-9). The Coast Guard acquired the ship on 23 August 1946 and renamed her USCGC Acushnet (WAT-167). She has become one of the workhorses of the Coast Guard and the last of her class. The Acushnet remains notable for her dependability in changing environments and during different missions as a tug, oceanographic vessel, and medium endurance cutter.
  • Survey number: HAER AK-49
  • Building/structure dates: 1942-1943 Initial Construction
  • Building/structure dates: 1984 Subsequent Work
  • Building/structure dates: 2007

Photo, Print, Drawing USS SHACKLE, ARS 9, Ketchikan, Ketchikan Gateway Borough, AK

The Library of Congress does not own rights to material in its collections. Therefore, it does not license or charge permission fees for use of such material and cannot grant or deny permission to publish or otherwise distribute the material.

Ultimately, it is the researcher's obligation to assess copyright or other use restrictions and obtain permission from third parties when necessary before publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the Library's collections.

  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on images made by the U.S. Government images copied from other sources may be restricted. https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/114_habs.html
  • Reproduction Number: ---
  • Call Number: HAER AK-49
  • Access Advisory: ---

Obtaining Copies

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If only black-and-white ("b&w") sources are listed and you desire a copy showing color or tint (assuming the original has any), you can generally purchase a quality copy of the original in color by citing the Call Number listed above and including the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

Price lists, contact information, and order forms are available on the Duplication Services Web site.

Access to Originals

Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)

  • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.
    As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)
  • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?

  • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.
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To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.


Photo, Print, Drawing Inboard Profile - USS SHACKLE, ARS 9, Ketchikan, Ketchikan Gateway Borough, AK Drawings from Survey HAER AK-49

The Library of Congress does not own rights to material in its collections. Therefore, it does not license or charge permission fees for use of such material and cannot grant or deny permission to publish or otherwise distribute the material.

Ultimately, it is the researcher's obligation to assess copyright or other use restrictions and obtain permission from third parties when necessary before publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the Library's collections.

  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on images made by the U.S. Government images copied from other sources may be restricted. https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/114_habs.html
  • Reproduction Number: ---
  • Call Number: HAER AK-49
  • Access Advisory: ---

Obtaining Copies

If an image is displaying, you can download it yourself. (Some images display only as thumbnails outside the Library of Congress because of rights considerations, but you have access to larger size images on site.)

Alternatively, you can purchase copies of various types through Library of Congress Duplication Services.

  1. If a digital image is displaying: The qualities of the digital image partially depend on whether it was made from the original or an intermediate such as a copy negative or transparency. If the Reproduction Number field above includes a reproduction number that starts with LC-DIG. then there is a digital image that was made directly from the original and is of sufficient resolution for most publication purposes.
  2. If there is information listed in the Reproduction Number field above: You can use the reproduction number to purchase a copy from Duplication Services. It will be made from the source listed in the parentheses after the number.

If only black-and-white ("b&w") sources are listed and you desire a copy showing color or tint (assuming the original has any), you can generally purchase a quality copy of the original in color by citing the Call Number listed above and including the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

Price lists, contact information, and order forms are available on the Duplication Services Web site.

Access to Originals

Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)

  • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.
    As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)
  • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?

  • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.
  • No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.

To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.


Summary Edit

Basalt Rock Company U.S. Navy U.S. Navy Croteau, Todd, project manager US Coast Guard, sponsor

This tag does not indicate the copyright status of the attached work. A normal copyright tag is still required. See Commons:Licensing.

  • See also HAER AK-50 for similar documentation. Includes drawings, photographs, and written data.
  • See also HAER MI-121 for similar documentation. Includes drawings, photographs, and written data.
  • Significance: The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Acushnet currently holds the distinction as the &#147Queen of the Fleet,&#148 the oldest cutter in the Coast Guard. She has served her country for sixty-three years, beginning service during World War II as the USS Shackle (ARS-9). The Coast Guard acquired the ship on 23 August 1946 and renamed her USCGC Acushnet (WAT-167). She has become one of the workhorses of the Coast Guard and the last of her class. The Acushnet remains notable for her dependability in changing environments and during different missions as a tug, oceanographic vessel, and medium endurance cutter.
  • Survey number: HAER AK-49
  • Building/structure dates: 1942-1943 Initial Construction
  • Building/structure dates: 1984 Subsequent Work
  • Building/structure dates: 2007

Contents

Following shakedown out of San Diego, California, Shackle proceeded to Pearl Harbor. In May, she continued west to Midway Island where she cleared the entrance channel of the wreckage of Macaw (ARS-11). She then returned to Hawaii and, in late November, took ARD-2H in tow and again headed west. Brief duties at Eniwetok, Guam, and Saipan followed and, in late January 1945, she commenced preparations for the assault on Iwo Jima.

Okinawa operations [ edit ]

A unit of Task Force 51, she arrived in the Volcano Islands on 19 February and remained until 10 March. Having completed over 44 salvage and diving assignments, she then sailed for Ulithi to prepare for the Okinawa campaign. On 27 March, she departed the Carolines for the Ryukyus where, operating from Kerama Retto, she provided assistance to ships on the vulnerable screening stations in the Okinawa area and made repairs and pumped water from damaged ships in preparation for docking them. In May alone, she provided salvage and repair assistance to 21 ships, many of which were kamikaze victims.

Minesweeping the East China Sea [ edit ]

On 1 July, Shackle joined Task Group 39.11, a mine-sweeping group and, during that month, as area "Juneau" in the East China Sea was swept, she combined salvage and mine disposal duties. At the end of the month, she returned to Buckner Bay, where, on 12 August, she witnessed the torpedoing of Pennsylvania and immediately commenced salvage work on the damaged battleship. Three days later, the war ended.

End-of-war activity [ edit ]

Shackle remained in the Buckner Bay area until 20 September. She then sailed for Tokyo Bay where, into November, she was employed in clearing the docking area at Yokosuka. On the 27th, she started back across the Pacific Ocean. Salvage duties interrupted her voyage at Wake Island. At the end of December, she arrived at Pearl Harbor and, in February 1946, continued on to the west coast.


  • Title: USS SHACKLE, ARS 9, Ketchikan, Ketchikan Gateway Borough, AK
  • Other Title: U.S. Coast Guard Cutter ACUSHNET
    WMEC 167
    WAGO-167
    WAT 167
  • Creator(s): Historic American Engineering Record, creator
  • Related Names:
       Basalt Rock Company
       U.S. Coast Guard
       U.S. Navy
       U.S. Navy
       Croteau, Todd , project manager
       US Coast Guard , sponsor
  • Date Created/Published: Documentation compiled after 1968
  • Medium: Photo(s): 33
    Measured Drawing(s): 10
    Data Page(s): 36
    Photo Caption Page(s): 2
  • Reproduction Number: ---
  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on images made by the U.S. Government images copied from other sources may be restricted. (http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/114_habs.html)
  • Call Number: HAER AK-49
  • Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
  • Notes:
    • See also HAER AK-50 for similar documentation. Includes drawings, photographs, and written data.
    • See also HAER MI-121 for similar documentation. Includes drawings, photographs, and written data.
    • Significance: The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Acushnet currently holds the distinction as the “Queen of the Fleet,” the oldest cutter in the Coast Guard. She has served her country for sixty-three years, beginning service during World War II as the USS Shackle (ARS-9). The Coast Guard acquired the ship on 23 August 1946 and renamed her USCGC Acushnet (WAT-167). She has become one of the workhorses of the Coast Guard and the last of her class. The Acushnet remains notable for her dependability in changing environments and during different missions as a tug, oceanographic vessel, and medium endurance cutter.
    • Survey number: HAER AK-49
    • Building/structure dates: 1942-1943 Initial Construction
    • Building/structure dates: 1984 Subsequent Work
    • Building/structure dates: 2007
    • ships
    • military organizations
    • maritime
    • cutters
    • war (World War II)
    • search & rescue operations
    • oceanography
    • science
    • Alaska -- Ketchikan Gateway Borough -- Ketchikan
    • Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record/Historic American Landscapes Survey

    The Library of Congress generally does not own rights to material in its collections and, therefore, cannot grant or deny permission to publish or otherwise distribute the material. For further rights information, see "Rights Information" below and the Rights and Restrictions Information page ( http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/rights.html ).

    • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on images made by the U.S. Government images copied from other sources may be restricted. http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/114_habs.html
    • Reproduction Number: ---
    • Call Number: HAER AK-49
    • Medium: Photo(s): 33
      Measured Drawing(s): 10
      Data Page(s): 36
      Photo Caption Page(s): 2

    If Digital Images Are Displaying

    You can download online images yourself. Alternatively, you can purchase copies of various types through Library of Congress Duplication Services.

    HABS/HAER/HALS materials have generally been scanned at high resolution that is suitable for most publication purposes (see Digitizing the Collection for further details about the digital images).

    • Make note of the Call Number and Item Number that appear under the photograph in the multiple-image display (e.g., HAER, NY,52-BRIG,4-2).
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    If Digital Images Are Not Displaying

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      • Call Number: HAER AK-49
      • Medium: Photo(s): 33
        Measured Drawing(s): 10
        Data Page(s): 36
        Photo Caption Page(s): 2

      Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

      Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.

      As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)

      No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

      Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.

      No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.

      If you do not see a thumbnail image or a reference to another surrogate, please fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room. In many cases, the originals can be served in a few minutes. Other materials require appointments for later the same day or in the future. Reference staff can advise you in both how to fill out a call slip and when the item can be served.

      To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.


      Photo, Print, Drawing 1942 Arrangements - USS SHACKLE, ARS 9, Ketchikan, Ketchikan Gateway Borough, AK Drawings from Survey HAER AK-49

      The Library of Congress does not own rights to material in its collections. Therefore, it does not license or charge permission fees for use of such material and cannot grant or deny permission to publish or otherwise distribute the material.

      Ultimately, it is the researcher's obligation to assess copyright or other use restrictions and obtain permission from third parties when necessary before publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the Library's collections.

      • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on images made by the U.S. Government images copied from other sources may be restricted. https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/114_habs.html
      • Reproduction Number: ---
      • Call Number: HAER AK-49
      • Access Advisory: ---

      Obtaining Copies

      If an image is displaying, you can download it yourself. (Some images display only as thumbnails outside the Library of Congress because of rights considerations, but you have access to larger size images on site.)

      Alternatively, you can purchase copies of various types through Library of Congress Duplication Services.

      1. If a digital image is displaying: The qualities of the digital image partially depend on whether it was made from the original or an intermediate such as a copy negative or transparency. If the Reproduction Number field above includes a reproduction number that starts with LC-DIG. then there is a digital image that was made directly from the original and is of sufficient resolution for most publication purposes.
      2. If there is information listed in the Reproduction Number field above: You can use the reproduction number to purchase a copy from Duplication Services. It will be made from the source listed in the parentheses after the number.

      If only black-and-white ("b&w") sources are listed and you desire a copy showing color or tint (assuming the original has any), you can generally purchase a quality copy of the original in color by citing the Call Number listed above and including the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

      Price lists, contact information, and order forms are available on the Duplication Services Web site.

      Access to Originals

      Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

      Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)

      • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.
        As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)
      • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

      Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?

      • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.
      • No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.

      To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.


      Shackle ARS-9 - History

      • Having sold out all copies of our previous editions of The Coast Guard, our signature coffee table book, and copies going for more than $300 on Amazon.com, we printed a third edition. Updated with a chapter USCG Commandant Admiral Paul Zukunft, our editor LCDR Tom Beard, USCG (Ret.) once again produced an exceptional book.
      • Joining forces with the National Coast Guard Museum Association (NCGMA) in their effort to establish a National Coast Guard Museum, a founding goal of the Foundation, the Foundation co-sponsored the establishment of the Museum Exhibit Advisory Panel or MEAP. The goal of the MEAP is to gain input from those organizations that have been working to preserve, show, and educate the publish about the United States Coast Guard and her predecessor services, and their contribution to the Nation.

      The Museum Exhibit Advisory Panel (MEAP) is responsible for providing input and offering recommendations regarding the exhibition design for the future National Coast Guard Museum.

      The Museum Exhibit Advisory Panel (MEAP) will:

      • Identify potential exhibit themes that best represent the Coast Guard past, present, and future.
      • Respond to requests for architectural input and review of exhibit space design, use of technology, and traffic flow in order to maximize the museum visitor experience.
      • Serve as active sponsors and advocates for promoting the museum within each member’s respective organization.

      The Museum Exhibit Advisory Panel (MEAP) is comprised of representatives of interested non-profit organizations and CG representatives who aspire to preserve and promote the culture and traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

      Additionally, the Panel will include museum subject matter experts and an active Coast Guard historian(s) and curator(s). The following organizations have been participating since January 2016.


      Watch the video: 3D Video Desain Rumah Bapak Nelson @ Sumatera Utara by Emporio Architect (August 2022).