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The Saints of Epilepsy

The Saints of EpilepsyMurphy, Edward L.Medical History, Vol.3:4 (1959)AbstractEpilepsy, at least in its grand mal variety, presents so dramatic and, to the lay observer, so terifyinga spectacle that it is not strange that its victims readily resorted to supernatural aid for alleviation. Unlike so many other diseases it offers no external signs of its presence and the horrifying suddenness with which apparently healthy and normal people could be transformed into writhing convulsives must have gone a long way in suggesting that the syndrome resulted from visitations of God or from His temporary defeat by the powers of evil.
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11th Century Castle in Condom, France, for sale

An 11th century castle near the town of Condom, in Gascony, is for sale. The property belonged to the family of a nobleman, le Seigneur Bertrand de Marreaux, for more than 700 years. It is now being marketed with a €310,000 price tag, after being reduced by some 30 percent.Close to the market town of Vic Fezensac in the middle of the Gers département, the small, stonghold, which has walls 100 cm thick, fell into ruin in the 19th century and although it was partly rebuilt in the 20th, it nonetheless requires a considerable amount of tender loving care to return it to its former medieval stature.
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Selectivity of Black Death mortality with respect to preexisting health

Selectivity of Black Death mortality with respect to preexisting healthBy Sharon N. WoodProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol.105:5 (2008)Abstract: Was the mortality associated with the deadliest known epidemic in human history, the Black Death of 1347–1351, selective with respect to preexisting health conditions (‘‘frailty’’)?
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We have chosen a few things from among many: the adaptations and suitability of nuns’ rules in Merovingian Gaul

We have chosen a few things from among many: the adaptations and suitability of nuns’ rules in Merovingian GaulBy Autumn DolanM.A. Thesis, University of Missouri–Columbia, 2009Abstract: The nuns’ rules of Caesarius of Arles (470-542), Donatus of Besanc̜on (fl. 624), and Waldebert of Luxeuil (d. c. 668) suggest that for the early medieval female community in Merovingian Gaul, the monastic rule was a versatile and influential text that could be used to express the idiosyncrasies of female religious life, to serve as a spiritual guideline, or even to exert the administrative autonomy of female monasteries.
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